Those who are on the data privacy career path and others that are making a career out of it have been thriving before the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The market and job security for these highly skilled and trained professionals have been on the upswing as privacy became a mainstream topic.

While there were initial concerns that privacy professionals would be adversely affected by the pandemic, recent data suggests that the privacy space has been strong and resilient. A global survey conducted by the IAPP revealed that respondents are optimistic about the future of privacy despite the ongoing pandemic.

A staggering 72% predict few to no layoffs in the privacy department and another 81% expects minimal to no change in terms of privacy budget. This development is not exactly surprising as more and more businesses and organisations are realising they will be using personal data as storefronts close down and they go virtual.

It is also not surprising that more and more certifications and courses such as the GRC course are being offered to help ensure privacy and data protection professionals are up to date and can do their jobs better. Also, with more privacy issues popping up, it has helped keep the profile of privacy in the forefront.

Privacy and the COVID-19 Pandemic

It is reassuring to know that privacy has remained robust given its presence in a lot of areas that are related to the pandemic such as the use of contract tracing tools, the generation of personal health devices, and other personalised scenarios such as online learning and telework.

Privacy’s staying power during the pandemic did not materialise as the pandemic took shape. Privacy has always been part of how organisations, businesses, and societies operate. However, nowadays, it has become a key part of the regulations and the rules businesses, organisations, and societies engage.

When privacy is embedded within the organisation, it cannot be a standalone silo. For it to be effective, it is crucial that it is embedded throughout the organisation and its many facets. Over the past decade, it has changed dramatically because there is no choice or alternative when it comes to privacy compliance.

Many experts agree that privacy and compliance cannot be set aside. While some organisations will resort to cutting privacy budgets or personnel, they might be doing so wilfully but without thorough consideration. However, this move is considered shortsighted as you can end up spending more when privacy problems arise.

Anyone who has set their sights on the post-pandemic privacy job market might find themselves in a very favorable position. It is predicted that there will be a steady rise for six months to a year before a boom occurs. From a privacy perspective, many data slipups can occur, with organisations running in a panic during the period and being less detail-oriented.

The same scenario was experienced during the 2008 – 2009 economic shutdown. If anything, there is an expected increase in privacy jobs after things like breaches become more rampant.

Author