Making errors is a natural part of life. Many of the mistakes that developers make, though, may be avoided. You will be able to create better and cleaner code if you can avoid the frequent pitfalls discussed in this article.

This will benefit not just you, but also other developers who will have to check through your code. So you’re not only benefiting yourself—you’re also benefiting your team.

Here are a few of the most typical blunders to avoid.

  • In one function, there are much too many things going on.

A function should only be accountable for one item, according to the single responsibility pattern. There are far too many functions that fetch, process, and show data all in one. Splitting this out is seen to be better programming. There is a function that retrieves the data, a function that processes the data, and a function that displays the data.

It is critical to keep a function focused on a specific issue since it makes it more resilient. Let’s pretend that the data in the previous example came from an API. If the API is changed—for example, if a new version is released—the processing code is more likely to break if it is part of the same function. The data display will most likely break as a result of this.

  •  Code formatting that is a mess

People who don’t have a lot of programming knowledge are notorious for messing up the formatting of code. Whether you ask most engineers with a few years of experience if they know a tester or data scientist that screwed up code formatting, they’ll definitely nod. Stuff is due to a lack of experience—unless they’re using a programming language like Python, which takes care of a lot of this for you.

  1. Using a linter is one of the most frequent approaches to fix sloppy formatting. All current IDEs have the ability to correct this for you as well. Sometimes you’ll need to install a plugin, and other times you’ll be able to do it right away.
  2. Tutorial Hell: When you’re viewing tutorials one by one without getting your hands dirty, you’re in Tutorial Hell (without writing code on your own). You’re not taking notes or putting things into practise on your own. You won’t grasp the concept unless you create the instructional code yourself at least once, and you’ll have to watch it again and again. You’ll eventually get stuck in a loop of solely viewing tutorials, sometimes known as tutorial hell.
  3. Leaving Data Structures and Algorithms Behind: Data Structures and Algorithms are the most significant aspect of your whole coding adventure. You won’t be able to succeed in the programming industry if you don’t learn DSA. As a result, constantly devote time to studying DSA and combining development and practise. Also, before moving on to advanced data structures, be sure you’ve covered the basics.

 When you first start coding, you may experience some dread or self-doubt. Join communities like https://www.devhubby.com

Students desire to compare themselves to others, such as seniors or students who have advanced to a specific level while you are just starting out. As a result, you’ll believe they’ve done a lot in their first or second year, and you’ll think I should as well. Rather of comparing yourself to others, be inspired by them. Speak with them, seek their advice, and learn from their experiences. And keep in mind that whatever you’re doing or learning is fantastic! Quality takes precedence over quantity. Don’t try to do too much.

 Practicing should never come to an end. You should not give up on coding challenges. If you take a long break from coding and then return to problem-solving, it will take some time for you to re-enter that flow of tackling any challenge. To become a proficient programmer, solve at least one coding challenge every day and avoid these coding errors.

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